15 years in Debora

My days at Debora In 2004 I resigned from several positions, studied TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), and was sent as a VIMO (Volunteer In Mission Overseas) to the Angkola Church, one of the smallest, most isolated Batak churches in Indonesia, to Debora Home. Panti Asuhan Debora (PAD) “home of helping” is funded by Lutheran Women of Australia (LWA). Residents are orphans, have one parent, or are very poor. Debora gives them a Christian home and a secondary schooling in nearby Sipirok. LWA, you have greatly increased …

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Children singing at Debora Orphanage, North Sumatra, Indonesia

A passion and heart for Debora

This year Rosemary Winderlich again visited Debora in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Jo Veerhuis and Chris Stott joined Rosemary on the visit to the home supported by the Lutheran women across Australia.

In spending even a few minutes with Rosemary, it becomes clear she has a passion and a heart for Debora but now readily suggests: “I’m not as indestructible as I was”.

The following extracts from her journal include Rosemary’s reflections and offer great insights into Debora and the Indonesian culture. Her travels begin with the bus trip to Debora.

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